Separating fact, fiction as water conservation ratchets up.

It’s human nature to want to believe that someone else is not doing their part before we each have to do ours. There are many such misconceptions about the current drought.

  • Agriculture uses a majority of delivered water and is getting a pass in water restrictions. While Santa Cruzans are restricted to 80 percent of a normal allocation, many farmers that rely on federal and state water are allocated zero percent and 20 percent of their contracted amount. This has contributed to a 2.8 million acre-foot cutback, 17,000 jobs lost, a $1.5 billion economic loss, and over 400,000 acres fallowed — and those are the numbers just through last year.
  • Environmentalists blocked water-storage projects. In the past few decades, storage equal to two Shasta Lakes was built in California by regional water agencies including roughly 5 million acre-feet of new groundwater storage.
  • Hydraulic fracturing takes huge amounts of water. The Department of Conservation estimates that hydraulic fracturing in California uses a relatively small amount of water — the equivalent of about 430 households annually for all hydraulic fractured wells in the state.
  • Water managers choose water for protecting fish over water for farms. Fish are important, and thousands of coastal jobs depend on healthy fish runs. But the water that flows through the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta also keeps salt from the San Francisco Bay from coming into the Delta and water intakes, especially in very dry years like this one. Construction recently started on a temporary rock barrier to help keep salt out of the Delta this summer, indicating there is not a lot of extra water flowing into the San Francisco Bay.
  • Nestle bottles a huge amount of California water. Nestle captures 1/1000th of 1 percent of the state’s water for its production.
  • New storage right now would fight the drought. An Australian was asked why they didn’t build dams in the middle of their drought. He responded that it would not have helped, as there were no flows to capture.
  • Large amounts of water are shipped from Northern California to Southern California, where residents are not efficient. The greater Southern California area has grown by over 4 million people in the last generation — on LESS water.
  • Northern cities without water meters use excessive amounts of water. The new mandatory state water restrictions still apply to these cities, and they will have to reduce their water consumption by the same percentages as the rest of the state.
  • Water restrictions are not fair to warmer areas of the state. New water restrictions are based on 2013 usage, and warmer areas of the state used more water in that year.

Read more of the article here.

 

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Still Using City Water (Drinking Water!) in Your Cooling Tower?

Cooling systems are typically the greatest user of water in commercial and industrial buildings?

What if we monitored it so we could optimize it – potentially saving hundreds and thousands of gallons of water?

What if we reused that water – so ZERO city water (DRINKING WATER!) was being used at all?

Water Savings. Energy Savings. Cost Savings.

IT’S ALL POSSIBLE.

When the well is dry, we learn the worth

MAY THE FOURTH BE WITH YOU

“Younglings younglings, gather round,” said Yoda.

Just because water is priced too cheap in most of the world, doesn’t mean we can afford to waste it.

  • Freshwater withdrawals have tripled over the last 50 years.
  • The world’s population is growing by roughly 80 million people each year.
  • Changes in lifestyles and eating habits are requiring more water consumption per capita. Food demands will increase 50% by 2030.
  • Energy demand is also accelerating, with corresponding implications for water demand. Energy demands will increase by 60% by 2030.
  • Pollution knows no borders! 90% of wastewater in developing countries is untreated.

Wastewater treatment and water reuse are critical!

This May Fourth, remember to be mindful of our most precious resource and how quickly it’s running out.

“Always pass on what you have learned,” so says the Grand Master of the Jedi Order.

 

Yoda

Today is World Health Day.

Did you know that diarrhea caused by inadequate drinking water, sanitation, and hand hygiene kills an estimated 842,000 people every year globally (approximately 2,300 people per day)?

Did you know that 750 million people around the world lack access to safe water; 1 in 9 people?

Did you know that more than twice the population of the U.S. lives without access to safe water?

Let’s make it a priority to conserve water and become stewards of the world’s most precious resource. It’s the least we can do.

Learn more here: Get Involved

wawter related disease death

 

Did You Know?

Salt water makes up 97.5% of all of Earth’s water. Of the 2.5% of fresh water left on this planet, only 0.008% is readily available for potable use.

4.8 billion people – more than half the world’s population – and approximately half of global grain production will be at risk due to water stress by 2050 if status quo continues.

Get serious about sustainability. You don’t have to put the environment at risk. Optimize your water use and quality.

Find out more at http://bit.ly/1zbu7FK.

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Aquanomix Recognized by Johnson Foundation

Aquanomix was recently included in a report issued by The Johnson Foundation at Wingspread on sustainable freshwater resources titled “Charting New Waters, Navigating to New Shores”.

The report was a six year effort led by Lynn Broaddus, Director of Environment Programs at the Johnson Foundation to provide a non-biased resource on the diminishing freshwater supply with recommendations to catalyze change.

Aquanomix is committed to the environment and preservation of fresh water sources.

The report can be found at http://goo.gl/w1Rsqz Aquanomix is mentioned on page 37 of the report.

 

Johnson Foundation pg37