We’re Speaking This Weekend.

Managing Partner, Rob O’Donnell is speaking this weekend at the 2015 Data Center World Conference in the National Harbor, Maryland. Aquanomix Project Architect Des Prosser will join him to reinforce the criticality of water quality management in data centers.

Join us on Sunday as we kick-off the conference at 1:00 p.m. with our presentation entitled: $100,000 per Day: In Mission-Critical Facilities, Operational Safety, Efficiency, and Reliability Are Everything.

Mission critical environments are just that critical to business functions. Without exception, they cannot endure any shutdowns or interruptions. This applies even during planned maintenance, making proper preparation a vital factor in reducing human errors, equipment failure, and downtime. Because cooling water systems are key to keeping operations up and running, they require proper chemical treatment and preventive maintenance. In today’s world of expensive energy, controlling water chemistry needs to be part of a data center’s comprehensive asset health program. This should include the inductive reasoning of a Failure Mode Effects Analysis (FMEA) with real-time data to provide early system warnings for potential critical asset failures in cooling systems.

From e-commerce, to information storage, to logistics, to communication with your customers, the Data Center has become the heartbeat of global business. It’s the critical backbone of your operations, setting the foundations for organizational readiness and success, today and in the future.

Disruptive change is here to stay.

 

The Details:

 

DCW

 

Join the Discussion Saturday.

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We all know it: Water treatment directly impacts heat exchange, energy use, and water use.

Join Aquanomix on Saturday morning at AWT as we talk about the power of data in the water industry. Hear from experts Desmond G. Prosser, Aquanomix, Project Architect and Lori McPherson, Walchem, Regional Sales Manager.

New technologies that create full transparency of the water treatment and water quality data are on the horizon. They will ultimately lead to a better water management program, lower operating costs, and a significant improvement in sustainable facilities management. Capital assets (hvac equipment) will be preserved, postponing a capital event, leading to a stronger P&L for the facility owner.

Water treatment professionals will have a terrific opportunity to help their clients understand, implement and operate these new optimization and benchmarking technologies as we move forward in this exciting chapter of our careers.

Learn more about technologies that powerfully marry heat exchange + water management data, which SAVES MONEY & IMPROVES PERFORMANCE.

We hope you’ll join us!
Date: Saturday, September 12, 2015
Time: 8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.
Location: 2015 Annual AWT Convention
Room: Omni Nashville Hotel, Broadway Ballroom A-E

 

 

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About Desmond G. Prosser

Desmond (Des) Graham Prosser was born in Wales and grew up in the Welsh valleys, a mountainous industrial region renowned for its rugby, coal and steel production, leeks, and world famous singers, such as Tom Jones, Harry Secombe, and Shirley Bassey. After graduating from college with a B.Sc. in analytical chemistry in 1964, Des went to work for the Nylon Spinning division of Imperial Chemical Industries. He worked as a industrial chemist in its laboratories, dealing with all manner of analytical activities, such as ensuring raw material product QC and power plant boiler water and steam purity. Three years later in 1967, and after a brief stint as a process control chemist working at the Coal Tar Distillation division of the National Coal Board (NCB), Des went to work as a water treatment specialist at British Steel Corporation (BSC). He dealt with every kind of water technology available in those days, including lime soda softening, continuous base-exchange operation, demineralization, high-pressure boiler operation, power generation, gas cleaning, cooling systems, and wastewater. After BSC, and during the period 1973–1982, Des’s next move was to work as a Technical Services Officer (TSO) in the industrial water treatment business of the Swiss firm Ciba-Geigy, based in Manchester, England. He was responsible for all technical support services to metal refining industries. (During that time Des worked with another Brit—Colin Frayne, also a member of the Aquanomix team!). In 1982, the water treatment business of Ciba-Geigy was sold to Drew Ameroid UK (which eventually became Ashland Water and now Solenis), and Des became global head of technical support for metal refining, then for monitoring and control systems, based in The Netherlands (Holland), and finally, back to the UK, running all group consulting and technical services. In 2003, Des left to open up his own company—DP Specialty Chemicals Ltd—and was initially exporting water treatment chemicals to African countries such as Nigeria, but also providing technical consulting services. The technical support side was more satisfying, and so in 2004, he decided to change the focus of his business to software design for industrial water treatment chemistry/energy prediction and control. Today, Des lives in Calne, Wiltshire, England, but consults around the world, and has recently teamed up with Aquanomix in North Carolina to help them develop their own various water/energy predictive and management software systems.

 

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About Lori McPherson

Lori McPherson has been a regional sales manager with Walchem/Iwaki America for 17 years. She has a B.S. in chemical engineering from Purdue University and an M.S. in systems engineering from Virginia Tech. Prior to Walchem, Lori held positions as a process engineer, waste treatment engineer, and analytical product manager specializing in conductivity, pH and ORP measurements. She has published many papers throughout the years on analytical measurement and control, with emphasis on ORP/chlorine control and accurate conductivity measurements.

The Business Case for Investments in Water Efficiency

“The U.S. has experienced a renaissance in energy efficiency investment over the past decade, spurred by a combination of rising energy prices, greater public awareness of climate change and a thriving ecosystem of capital providers, government programs and technical solutions,” writes Scott Henderson.

“Now it’s time to pursue a similar level of investment in water.”

Read the entire article here.

 

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Save the drinking water for drinking and not for flushing.

That’s the goal of new legislation that would require many large new buildings in San Francisco to use gray water — waste water from baths, sinks and other kitchen appliances — for toilet flushing and in their irrigation systems.

Check out how Symphony can support not only California’s Title 24, Part 6 Regulation, but also support the city of San Francisco’s new legislation on gray-water use, in a new one-sheet available for viewing here.

The legislation applies to yet-to-be constructed buildings that are 250,000 square feet and larger and in the city’s “purple-pipe” district.

Did you know: at perhaps the greenest building in the state, the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission building is using treated sewage water from about 1,000 employees to flush their toilets and irrigate some of their plants.

Their HQ at 525 Golden Gate consumes 60% less water than similarly sized buildings.

  • One of the first buildings in the nation with onsite treatment of gray and black water
  • An onsite “Living Machine” reclaims and treats all of the building’s wastewater to satisfy 100% of the water demand for the building’s low-flow toilets and urinals
  • The “Living Machine” system treats 5,000 gallons of wastewater per day and reduces per person water consumption from 12 gallons (normal office building) to 5 gallons
  • The building’s 25,000 gallon rainwater harvesting system provides water for irrigation uses around the building.

 

SF Title 24