Up & Running: Ethicon Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Facility Rainwater System

Aquanomix designed a custom system for Johnson & Johnson Company’s Ethicon Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Facility that reuses rainwater for cooling tower make-up water and irrigation.

The Ethicon facility in Cornelia, Georgia manufactures surgical and medical instruments.

The new facility was constructed on the same site of Ethicon’s sister company, Noramco Inc. Noramco, which has operated the Athens facility since 1981, manufactures pharmaceutical ingredients used in medications and medical devices. Both companies are subsidiaries of Johnson & Johnson.

More photos can be found at this link.

Thank you to our experienced and skilled reps at Heat Transfer Systems for helping to make this happen.

For inquiries or questions, please email marketing @ aquanomix dot com.

 

12046769_954834091257067_3589153106728433487_n IMG_0701 IMG_0717  IMG_0725 IMG_0730

They ain’t messin’ around, bro.

California Proposes ‘Unprecedented’ $1.5 Million Fine For Alleged Water Theft

California regulators are adopting something of a “no tolerance” policy for water theft.

“State officials have proposed fining a group of farmers an unprecedented $1.5 million for allegedly stealing water during the state’s devastating drought, the first fine levied against an individual or district with senior rights that are more than a century old,” the Associated Press reported.

The drought that has dragged on for four years in California has sparked tough policies reining in water consumption by individual, industrial, and agricultural users. The fine aims to extend cutback policies to the notoriously hard-to-reach black market for water.

“The state is fighting off court challenges to its authority to control water use and doubts over whether it has the resources to enforce its orders,” the report said.

Link to story here.

 

375_250-cali_drought_reg

 

The Business Case for Investments in Water Efficiency

“The U.S. has experienced a renaissance in energy efficiency investment over the past decade, spurred by a combination of rising energy prices, greater public awareness of climate change and a thriving ecosystem of capital providers, government programs and technical solutions,” writes Scott Henderson.

“Now it’s time to pursue a similar level of investment in water.”

Read the entire article here.

 

water-efficiency1

What is the Water-Energy Nexus?

Present day water and energy systems are interdependent.  Water is used in all phases of energy production and electricity generation. Energy is required to extract, treat and deliver water for human uses. Water and Energy. Energy and water.

These interdependencies are often referred to as the water-energy nexus, and recent developments have focused national attention on these connections. And that hasn’t been lost on us.

WE infographic_0

 

When severe drought affected more than a third of the United States in 2012, limited water availability constrained the operation of some power plants and other energy production activities.  There is now added complexity to the national dialogue on the relationship between energy and water resources.

The findings show that the scale of water use for energy production is tremendous. Some 580 billion cubic metres of freshwater are withdrawn for energy production every year*. At about 15% of the world’s total water withdrawal, the figure is second only to agriculture. To put it another way, the energy sector withdraws water at approximately the same rate that water flows down the Ganges (in India) or Mississippi (in the United States) Rivers – some of the very largest in the world.

 

Data for Thought

  • Total water withdrawals from all sources in the United States in 2011: 405,868 gallons per person (World Bank, 2011 and United States Census Bureau, 2011)
  • Electric power consumption in the United States in 2011: 13,246 kWh per person (World Bank, 2011)

Water is required to generate energy. Thermoelectric cooling, hydropower, energy mineral extraction and mining, fuel production (including fossil fuels, biofuels, and other non-conventional fuels), and emission controls all rely on large amounts of water. In the United States, the thermoelectric generating industry is the largest withdrawal user of water. According to USGS, 349 billion gallons of freshwater were withdrawn per day in the United States in the year 2005. The largest use, thermoelectric, accounted for 41 percent of freshwater withdrawn at 143 billion gallons per day (BGD).

  • Water withdrawal: The total volume removed from a water source such as a lake or river. Often, a large portion of this water is returned to the source and is available to be used again.
  • Water consumption: The amount of water removed for use and not returned to its source.

Water supply also requires energy use. A large amount of energy is needed to extract, convey, treat, and deliver potable water. Additionally, energy is required to collect, treat, and dispose of wastewater. In 2010, the U.S. water system consumed over 600 billion kWh, or approximately 12.6 percent of the nation’s energy according to a study by researchers at the University of Texas at Austin. The study found water systems use about 25 percent more energy than is used for residential or commercial lighting in the U.S.

Growing population: According to a 2012 United States Census Bureau projection, the U.S. population could reach 400 million people by 2051. Population growth affects energy use through increases in housing, commercial floor space, transportation, and economic activity. The U.S. Energy Information Administration estimates that total electricity consumption will grow from 3,841 billion kWh in 2011 to 4,930 billion kWh in 2040.

Agriculture: Feeding a growing population may require greater agricultural water use.  Agriculture accounts for approximately 37 percent of total freshwater withdrawals in the U.S., and 81 percent of water consumption.

 

The WETT

The WETT (Water-Energy Tech Team from the Federal Department of Energy) has drafted The Water-Energy Nexus Challenges and Opportunities, which frames an integrated challenge and opportunity space around the nexus for DOE and its partners and lays the foundation for future efforts.

The WETT has identified six strategic pillars that will serve as the foundation for coordinating R&D:

  1. Optimize the freshwater efficiency of energy production, electricity generation, and end-use technologies
  2. Optimize the energy efficiency of water management, treatment, distribution, and end-use technologies
  3. Enhance the reliability and resilience of energy and water technologies
  4. Increase safe and productive use of nontraditional water sources through improved technology
  5. Promote responsible energy operations with respect to water quality, ecosystem, and seismic impacts
  6. Exploit productive synergies among water and energy system technologies

Aquanomix’s Symphony addresses many of the strategic pillars of challenges and opportunities outlined by the WETT. Symphony manages and optimizes water and energy usage in cooling systems, including in data centers, hospitals, commercial buildings, research and institutions, manufacturing plants, et al.

Marrying the water quality data with the hvac system performance data allows the advanced controls system the opportunity to aggregate and analyze data by running algorithms to determine underperforming system components.

Symphony’s powerful Nexus Number aggregates water quality, water efficiency, energy efficiency data – the first technology of its kind that establishes and explores new relationships surrounding those data sets.

The value in a technology that marries energy and water quality data is powerful. It reveals transparency of operating costs and water quality management at such a granular level. The data supports swift and intelligent decision-making processes, which can save money and improve outcomes in performance.

Aquanomix is poised to support sweeping change throughout the water crisis using our critically important technologies. We know water. We’re ready to promote responsible water usage.

 

Symphony Homepage Windows Tablet

 

Thank you to the Department of Energy for information on the WETT. You can find out more about the WETT’s challenges here.

Thank you to the National Conference of State Legislatures for the facts and figures above. You can find out more in the report here.

You’re joking, right?

The New York Times cooking section made a suggestion that’s an affront to the sanctity of guacamole and–it turns out–the environment.

Peas in guacamole? Uhm. No.

According to the Water Footprint Network, one ounce of avocados requires 9.1 gallons of water. For one ounce of peas, you’ll need a staggering 44.5 gallons.

We’ll take ours sans peas, with a margarita.

peas guacamole

 

IBcon 2015: Aquanomix on Smart Water Panel

Aquanomix has been chosen as the water industry expert at 2015 IBcon – The Smart, Connected, High Performance Intelligent Buildings Conference.

Aquanomix Managing Partner and water industry expert, Rob O’Donnell will be on the Smart Building Tech Innovation Showcase Panel during the Smart WATER – Using Automation and Innovation to Achieve Extraordinary Efficiency session.

The panel will surround how much of the smart building conversations has revolved around energy and operational efficiency. Water, one of our most expensive and important resources, has been given very little consideration, especially when it comes to efficiency and conservation in our buildings. With some basic instrumentation applied to the existing water infrastructure in buildings/portfolios/campuses, there is the opportunity to monitor and manage this precious resource with a level of granularity never before seen. Usage, flow rate, pressure, leak detection, quality and other water related metrics are a few of the new opportunities afforded when smart water systems are added to the connected building ecosystem.

The panel will be moderated by Navigant’s Benjamin Freas. Rob’s fellow panel members will include David Doll of OSIsoft, Mike Mason of Weathermatic, and Logan Soya of Aquicore.

Please join us on June 10 at 12:45 p.m. – 1:45 p.m. at the Marriott Rivercenter in San Antonio, Texas.

Find out more here at the official IBcon page.

Aquanomix + IBcon

Aquanomix and the Newest Smithsonian Museum in DC

Last night on 60 Minutes, journalist Scott Pelley took us inside the making of Washington’s DC’s newest Smithsonian Museum: the National Museum of African America History and Culture. It took over eight decades, but a museum dedicated to African-American history and culture is finally taking shape on the National Mall in Washington.

In case you missed it, you can watch the feature here. Aquanomix was honored to design their water reuse system that will monitor, collect, filter and move all rainwater and groundwater for water closets, irrigation use and other water features.

“To be a part of something so historically significant to our country’s past and future is humbling and absolutely once-in-a-lifetime,” said Aquanomix Managing Partner, Rob O’Donnell.

 

Southland_0 smith3 smith2 1464