Aquanomix System Installed at Yale School of Medicine

The Aquanomix Rainwater Harvesting System is up and running at the Yale University School of Medicine Amistad Research Lab in New Haven, Connecticut.

The Amistad facility, at 10 Amistad Street, distinguished itself with its whole sustainable approach, using collected rainwater and air handler condensate drainage for toilet flushing in a system designed by Aquanomix. Water collected on the roof of the research building is used in ultra-low-flow lavatories and dual-flush toilets.

This laboratory/vivarium interior renovation included biomedical research space, tissue culture rooms, cold rooms, specials labs and a vivarium to house rodents. Stem cell research will be performed in this building. This project has received a LEED® Gold certification.

Thanks to our fantastic reps at Engineered Product Sales for helping to make this happen.

Read more at Yale’s blog post here.

 

Join us at the 2015 Annual AWT Conference & Expo.

Join us at the 2015 Annual AWT Convention and Expo in Nashville this September. We are taking private B-to-B meetings and we’ll also be presenting on September 12 at 8:00 a.m. You won’t want to miss it!

The Details:

  • Presentation Title: The Art of Water Reuse and Optimization in a World of Diminishing Water Supply
  • Presenters: Desmond Prosser, Aquanomix Project Architect & Lori McPherson, Walchem
  • Time: 8:00 am – 8:30 am
  • Location: Omni — Broadway Ballroom A-E
  • Link to event information: click here.

Email us marketing (at) aquanomix (dot-com) to find meeting availability. See you there!

 

join us at the 2015 AWT Convention + expo

 

Aquanomix Rep on CBS New York in Response to Legionella

Aquanomix manufacturer’s rep: HIGHMARK‘s co-founders Richard Gerbe and Anthony Sannazzaro were interviewed by CBS New York regarding how to control bacterial growth in cooling towers and thus prevent disease outbreaks such as Legionnaires’. Watch the video here.

 

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They ain’t messin’ around, bro.

California Proposes ‘Unprecedented’ $1.5 Million Fine For Alleged Water Theft

California regulators are adopting something of a “no tolerance” policy for water theft.

“State officials have proposed fining a group of farmers an unprecedented $1.5 million for allegedly stealing water during the state’s devastating drought, the first fine levied against an individual or district with senior rights that are more than a century old,” the Associated Press reported.

The drought that has dragged on for four years in California has sparked tough policies reining in water consumption by individual, industrial, and agricultural users. The fine aims to extend cutback policies to the notoriously hard-to-reach black market for water.

“The state is fighting off court challenges to its authority to control water use and doubts over whether it has the resources to enforce its orders,” the report said.

Link to story here.

 

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It’s the data, stupid!

Thank you to AutomatedBuildings.com for publishing some original Aquanomix content on water and data centers.

Be smart! Read about why it’s tough to manage what you can’t, or don’t, measure here.

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Save the drinking water for drinking and not for flushing.

That’s the goal of new legislation that would require many large new buildings in San Francisco to use gray water — waste water from baths, sinks and other kitchen appliances — for toilet flushing and in their irrigation systems.

Check out how Symphony can support not only California’s Title 24, Part 6 Regulation, but also support the city of San Francisco’s new legislation on gray-water use, in a new one-sheet available for viewing here.

The legislation applies to yet-to-be constructed buildings that are 250,000 square feet and larger and in the city’s “purple-pipe” district.

Did you know: at perhaps the greenest building in the state, the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission building is using treated sewage water from about 1,000 employees to flush their toilets and irrigate some of their plants.

Their HQ at 525 Golden Gate consumes 60% less water than similarly sized buildings.

  • One of the first buildings in the nation with onsite treatment of gray and black water
  • An onsite “Living Machine” reclaims and treats all of the building’s wastewater to satisfy 100% of the water demand for the building’s low-flow toilets and urinals
  • The “Living Machine” system treats 5,000 gallons of wastewater per day and reduces per person water consumption from 12 gallons (normal office building) to 5 gallons
  • The building’s 25,000 gallon rainwater harvesting system provides water for irrigation uses around the building.

 

SF Title 24

An Innovative Water + Energy Management Solution in Real-time

It’s never been done before!

But why?

The value in a technology that marries energy and water quality data is powerful. It reveals transparency of operating costs and water quality management at such a granular level. The data supports swift and intelligent decision-making processes, which can save money and improve outcomes in performance.

View our newest one-sheet here.

And don’t forget! Aquanomix Managing Partner Robert M. O’Donnell will be speaking at Data Center World in September. It’s a presentation you won’t want to miss.

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We are proud to introduce Symphony.

 

 

New Project Spotlights!

We offer custom turn-key solutions for water reuse in commercial and industrial buildings. We can blather on all day about our best-in-class systems, but instead, we’ve decided to let our work and our clients do the talking. View some of our case study / project spotlights here. Did someone say… the Smithsonian?

What is the Water-Energy Nexus?

Present day water and energy systems are interdependent.  Water is used in all phases of energy production and electricity generation. Energy is required to extract, treat and deliver water for human uses. Water and Energy. Energy and water.

These interdependencies are often referred to as the water-energy nexus, and recent developments have focused national attention on these connections. And that hasn’t been lost on us.

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When severe drought affected more than a third of the United States in 2012, limited water availability constrained the operation of some power plants and other energy production activities.  There is now added complexity to the national dialogue on the relationship between energy and water resources.

The findings show that the scale of water use for energy production is tremendous. Some 580 billion cubic metres of freshwater are withdrawn for energy production every year*. At about 15% of the world’s total water withdrawal, the figure is second only to agriculture. To put it another way, the energy sector withdraws water at approximately the same rate that water flows down the Ganges (in India) or Mississippi (in the United States) Rivers – some of the very largest in the world.

 

Data for Thought

  • Total water withdrawals from all sources in the United States in 2011: 405,868 gallons per person (World Bank, 2011 and United States Census Bureau, 2011)
  • Electric power consumption in the United States in 2011: 13,246 kWh per person (World Bank, 2011)

Water is required to generate energy. Thermoelectric cooling, hydropower, energy mineral extraction and mining, fuel production (including fossil fuels, biofuels, and other non-conventional fuels), and emission controls all rely on large amounts of water. In the United States, the thermoelectric generating industry is the largest withdrawal user of water. According to USGS, 349 billion gallons of freshwater were withdrawn per day in the United States in the year 2005. The largest use, thermoelectric, accounted for 41 percent of freshwater withdrawn at 143 billion gallons per day (BGD).

  • Water withdrawal: The total volume removed from a water source such as a lake or river. Often, a large portion of this water is returned to the source and is available to be used again.
  • Water consumption: The amount of water removed for use and not returned to its source.

Water supply also requires energy use. A large amount of energy is needed to extract, convey, treat, and deliver potable water. Additionally, energy is required to collect, treat, and dispose of wastewater. In 2010, the U.S. water system consumed over 600 billion kWh, or approximately 12.6 percent of the nation’s energy according to a study by researchers at the University of Texas at Austin. The study found water systems use about 25 percent more energy than is used for residential or commercial lighting in the U.S.

Growing population: According to a 2012 United States Census Bureau projection, the U.S. population could reach 400 million people by 2051. Population growth affects energy use through increases in housing, commercial floor space, transportation, and economic activity. The U.S. Energy Information Administration estimates that total electricity consumption will grow from 3,841 billion kWh in 2011 to 4,930 billion kWh in 2040.

Agriculture: Feeding a growing population may require greater agricultural water use.  Agriculture accounts for approximately 37 percent of total freshwater withdrawals in the U.S., and 81 percent of water consumption.

 

The WETT

The WETT (Water-Energy Tech Team from the Federal Department of Energy) has drafted The Water-Energy Nexus Challenges and Opportunities, which frames an integrated challenge and opportunity space around the nexus for DOE and its partners and lays the foundation for future efforts.

The WETT has identified six strategic pillars that will serve as the foundation for coordinating R&D:

  1. Optimize the freshwater efficiency of energy production, electricity generation, and end-use technologies
  2. Optimize the energy efficiency of water management, treatment, distribution, and end-use technologies
  3. Enhance the reliability and resilience of energy and water technologies
  4. Increase safe and productive use of nontraditional water sources through improved technology
  5. Promote responsible energy operations with respect to water quality, ecosystem, and seismic impacts
  6. Exploit productive synergies among water and energy system technologies

Aquanomix’s Symphony addresses many of the strategic pillars of challenges and opportunities outlined by the WETT. Symphony manages and optimizes water and energy usage in cooling systems, including in data centers, hospitals, commercial buildings, research and institutions, manufacturing plants, et al.

Marrying the water quality data with the hvac system performance data allows the advanced controls system the opportunity to aggregate and analyze data by running algorithms to determine underperforming system components.

Symphony’s powerful Nexus Number aggregates water quality, water efficiency, energy efficiency data – the first technology of its kind that establishes and explores new relationships surrounding those data sets.

The value in a technology that marries energy and water quality data is powerful. It reveals transparency of operating costs and water quality management at such a granular level. The data supports swift and intelligent decision-making processes, which can save money and improve outcomes in performance.

Aquanomix is poised to support sweeping change throughout the water crisis using our critically important technologies. We know water. We’re ready to promote responsible water usage.

 

Symphony Homepage Windows Tablet

 

Thank you to the Department of Energy for information on the WETT. You can find out more about the WETT’s challenges here.

Thank you to the National Conference of State Legislatures for the facts and figures above. You can find out more in the report here.

We’re in California – right now!

Some of the fine Aquanomix staff is West Coast based for the next 5 weeks taking on the California drought with our industrial + commercial water reuse and water optimization solutions. We’re taking meetings with some of the world’s largest companies and thought leaders.

HEY CALI: WE’RE HERE TO HELP!

First stop: LA; Next stop: San Fran.

If you’re in the area, please contact us so we can meet and talk about solutions to help your commercial and industrial building(s) address the drought risks. Email us at this email address.

 

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