Brochure: Industrial + Commercial Water Reuse Systems

Typically, we see the following sources of makeup water in re-use systems:

  • Rainwater
  • Storm water
  • Foundation water
  • Grey water
  • Air Handler Condensate
  • Steam Condensate
  • Filtration backwash water
  • Cooling tower blow down
  • Process water

Typically, we reuse water for the following:

  • Cooling tower make up
  • Boiler make up
  • Toilet flushing
  • Irrigation
  • Roof misting
  • Process water
  • Street or building washing

Download our newest brochure on water reuse here.

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California’s data center industry is a thirsty business in a parched state.

Which is one BIG reason why water quality and water volume usage monitoring 7×24 is absolutely imperative.

Data Centers and Hidden Water Use: In California, computer farms are under scrutiny for their large and growing use of water for cooling.

WSJ Link to the story by Drew Fitzgerald.

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What is risk? – George Costanza

Risk Management 101: Even if George Costanza is in charge of your facility’s risk management, Symphony can support mitigation of critical asset failure and debilitating operational downtime.

You continuously monitor your entire building with real-time data. You monitor everything except your cooling water, correct? Let’s help you change that.

Let us ask you one question. What risk can you afford?

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We know water, so you don’t have to. Continuous commissioning and real-time data of one of the most variable parts of your cooling system: water quality.

 

Separating fact, fiction as water conservation ratchets up.

It’s human nature to want to believe that someone else is not doing their part before we each have to do ours. There are many such misconceptions about the current drought.

  • Agriculture uses a majority of delivered water and is getting a pass in water restrictions. While Santa Cruzans are restricted to 80 percent of a normal allocation, many farmers that rely on federal and state water are allocated zero percent and 20 percent of their contracted amount. This has contributed to a 2.8 million acre-foot cutback, 17,000 jobs lost, a $1.5 billion economic loss, and over 400,000 acres fallowed — and those are the numbers just through last year.
  • Environmentalists blocked water-storage projects. In the past few decades, storage equal to two Shasta Lakes was built in California by regional water agencies including roughly 5 million acre-feet of new groundwater storage.
  • Hydraulic fracturing takes huge amounts of water. The Department of Conservation estimates that hydraulic fracturing in California uses a relatively small amount of water — the equivalent of about 430 households annually for all hydraulic fractured wells in the state.
  • Water managers choose water for protecting fish over water for farms. Fish are important, and thousands of coastal jobs depend on healthy fish runs. But the water that flows through the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta also keeps salt from the San Francisco Bay from coming into the Delta and water intakes, especially in very dry years like this one. Construction recently started on a temporary rock barrier to help keep salt out of the Delta this summer, indicating there is not a lot of extra water flowing into the San Francisco Bay.
  • Nestle bottles a huge amount of California water. Nestle captures 1/1000th of 1 percent of the state’s water for its production.
  • New storage right now would fight the drought. An Australian was asked why they didn’t build dams in the middle of their drought. He responded that it would not have helped, as there were no flows to capture.
  • Large amounts of water are shipped from Northern California to Southern California, where residents are not efficient. The greater Southern California area has grown by over 4 million people in the last generation — on LESS water.
  • Northern cities without water meters use excessive amounts of water. The new mandatory state water restrictions still apply to these cities, and they will have to reduce their water consumption by the same percentages as the rest of the state.
  • Water restrictions are not fair to warmer areas of the state. New water restrictions are based on 2013 usage, and warmer areas of the state used more water in that year.

Read more of the article here.

 

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Aquanomix and the Newest Smithsonian Museum in DC

Last night on 60 Minutes, journalist Scott Pelley took us inside the making of Washington’s DC’s newest Smithsonian Museum: the National Museum of African America History and Culture. It took over eight decades, but a museum dedicated to African-American history and culture is finally taking shape on the National Mall in Washington.

In case you missed it, you can watch the feature here. Aquanomix was honored to design their water reuse system that will monitor, collect, filter and move all rainwater and groundwater for water closets, irrigation use and other water features.

“To be a part of something so historically significant to our country’s past and future is humbling and absolutely once-in-a-lifetime,” said Aquanomix Managing Partner, Rob O’Donnell.

 

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New US Water Stress Index Shows More Areas Vulnerable to Multiyear Drought

Read about it here:
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Technical Session Tomorrow in Vegas!

Aquanomix’s Technical Director Frank Ladd will be giving an AIA approved technical session on Water Reuse and Optimization at the CX Energy Expo tomorrow in Vegas at 2:15 p.m.

There is still time to register for the event!

A full list of presenters, including Aquanomix, can be found here: http://bit.ly/1MsloTT

 

 

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Top 10 states for LEED in 2014

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USGBC has just released the annual list of Top 10 States for LEED! All of the states that make up our Top 10 list have done an extraordinary job promoting LEED and making sustainable solutions a priority.

The per-capita list is based on 2010 U.S. Census data and includes commercial and institutional green building projects that were certified throughout 2014.

Full press release here

Neat infographic here!

 

Did You Know?

Salt water makes up 97.5% of all of Earth’s water. Of the 2.5% of fresh water left on this planet, only 0.008% is readily available for potable use.

4.8 billion people – more than half the world’s population – and approximately half of global grain production will be at risk due to water stress by 2050 if status quo continues.

Get serious about sustainability. You don’t have to put the environment at risk. Optimize your water use and quality.

Find out more at http://bit.ly/1zbu7FK.

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Have you signed the petition?

Many of you have already seen—and perhaps signed—the rainwater harvesting petition that’s been widely circulating, but for those who might not be aware of it, we would like to call your attention to it once more before next week’s deadline.

The American Rainwater Catchment Systems Association launched a petition last month to encourage and foster support for rainwater harvesting. ARCSA is hoping to collect 100,000 signatures (and as of this post, they are almost there) by December 16.

In times of drought it’s a no-brainer for the public to agree that rainwater harvesting is a good idea. This article includes some interesting statistics about how recent storms in the Los Angeles area have replenished the aquifer, but the ARCSA’s goal is to stimulate an industry to more actively capture rainwater—and to create jobs in the process. 

The full text of the petition appears below. You can find and sign the petition by clicking on this link: http://wh.gov/ia5tT.

We petition the White House to stimulate the emerging rainwater-harvesting industry through legislation or executive order, creating new jobs in design, installation, education, R&D, sales, plumbing, landscaping, roofing, monitoring and maintenance, which could propel the U.S. to international leadership, with compounding fiscal benefits.

The many justifications include:

  • Worldwide demand for clean water exceeds supply.
  • Rainwater can help fill the gap and reduce stormwater pollution.
  • One inch of rain is over 600 gallons per 1,000 sq. ft. of roof.
  • Rainwater is a valuable resource that reduces demand on water infrastructure.
  • A new national standard, ARCSA/ASPE/ANSI 63-2013 details safe design & installation.
  • Treated rainwater can easily surpass EPA standards.

Will you make your voice heard?