Brochure: Industrial + Commercial Water Reuse Systems

Typically, we see the following sources of makeup water in re-use systems:

  • Rainwater
  • Storm water
  • Foundation water
  • Grey water
  • Air Handler Condensate
  • Steam Condensate
  • Filtration backwash water
  • Cooling tower blow down
  • Process water

Typically, we reuse water for the following:

  • Cooling tower make up
  • Boiler make up
  • Toilet flushing
  • Irrigation
  • Roof misting
  • Process water
  • Street or building washing

Download our newest brochure on water reuse here.

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California’s data center industry is a thirsty business in a parched state.

Which is one BIG reason why water quality and water volume usage monitoring 7×24 is absolutely imperative.

Data Centers and Hidden Water Use: In California, computer farms are under scrutiny for their large and growing use of water for cooling.

WSJ Link to the story by Drew Fitzgerald.

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The Future of Water Use – 2015 IBcon

Aquanomix has an opinion on the Future of Water. (Of course, we do.)

Come hear what that opinion is.

Join us during the SMART Water Session: Is Water the New Energy? at IBcon / Realcomm in San Antonio in a week.

Read the article where Realcomm cited Aquanomix here. It’s a page turner… err… a mouse scroller.

 

Realcomm about Aquanomix

IBcon 2015: Aquanomix on Smart Water Panel

Aquanomix has been chosen as the water industry expert at 2015 IBcon – The Smart, Connected, High Performance Intelligent Buildings Conference.

Aquanomix Managing Partner and water industry expert, Rob O’Donnell will be on the Smart Building Tech Innovation Showcase Panel during the Smart WATER – Using Automation and Innovation to Achieve Extraordinary Efficiency session.

The panel will surround how much of the smart building conversations has revolved around energy and operational efficiency. Water, one of our most expensive and important resources, has been given very little consideration, especially when it comes to efficiency and conservation in our buildings. With some basic instrumentation applied to the existing water infrastructure in buildings/portfolios/campuses, there is the opportunity to monitor and manage this precious resource with a level of granularity never before seen. Usage, flow rate, pressure, leak detection, quality and other water related metrics are a few of the new opportunities afforded when smart water systems are added to the connected building ecosystem.

The panel will be moderated by Navigant’s Benjamin Freas. Rob’s fellow panel members will include David Doll of OSIsoft, Mike Mason of Weathermatic, and Logan Soya of Aquicore.

Please join us on June 10 at 12:45 p.m. – 1:45 p.m. at the Marriott Rivercenter in San Antonio, Texas.

Find out more here at the official IBcon page.

Aquanomix + IBcon

Separating fact, fiction as water conservation ratchets up.

It’s human nature to want to believe that someone else is not doing their part before we each have to do ours. There are many such misconceptions about the current drought.

  • Agriculture uses a majority of delivered water and is getting a pass in water restrictions. While Santa Cruzans are restricted to 80 percent of a normal allocation, many farmers that rely on federal and state water are allocated zero percent and 20 percent of their contracted amount. This has contributed to a 2.8 million acre-foot cutback, 17,000 jobs lost, a $1.5 billion economic loss, and over 400,000 acres fallowed — and those are the numbers just through last year.
  • Environmentalists blocked water-storage projects. In the past few decades, storage equal to two Shasta Lakes was built in California by regional water agencies including roughly 5 million acre-feet of new groundwater storage.
  • Hydraulic fracturing takes huge amounts of water. The Department of Conservation estimates that hydraulic fracturing in California uses a relatively small amount of water — the equivalent of about 430 households annually for all hydraulic fractured wells in the state.
  • Water managers choose water for protecting fish over water for farms. Fish are important, and thousands of coastal jobs depend on healthy fish runs. But the water that flows through the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta also keeps salt from the San Francisco Bay from coming into the Delta and water intakes, especially in very dry years like this one. Construction recently started on a temporary rock barrier to help keep salt out of the Delta this summer, indicating there is not a lot of extra water flowing into the San Francisco Bay.
  • Nestle bottles a huge amount of California water. Nestle captures 1/1000th of 1 percent of the state’s water for its production.
  • New storage right now would fight the drought. An Australian was asked why they didn’t build dams in the middle of their drought. He responded that it would not have helped, as there were no flows to capture.
  • Large amounts of water are shipped from Northern California to Southern California, where residents are not efficient. The greater Southern California area has grown by over 4 million people in the last generation — on LESS water.
  • Northern cities without water meters use excessive amounts of water. The new mandatory state water restrictions still apply to these cities, and they will have to reduce their water consumption by the same percentages as the rest of the state.
  • Water restrictions are not fair to warmer areas of the state. New water restrictions are based on 2013 usage, and warmer areas of the state used more water in that year.

Read more of the article here.

 

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Aquanomix and the Newest Smithsonian Museum in DC

Last night on 60 Minutes, journalist Scott Pelley took us inside the making of Washington’s DC’s newest Smithsonian Museum: the National Museum of African America History and Culture. It took over eight decades, but a museum dedicated to African-American history and culture is finally taking shape on the National Mall in Washington.

In case you missed it, you can watch the feature here. Aquanomix was honored to design their water reuse system that will monitor, collect, filter and move all rainwater and groundwater for water closets, irrigation use and other water features.

“To be a part of something so historically significant to our country’s past and future is humbling and absolutely once-in-a-lifetime,” said Aquanomix Managing Partner, Rob O’Donnell.

 

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We’ve added another rep firm!

Aquanomix is proud to announce the addition of another stellar manufacturer’s representative firm to our roster!

Barbieri & Kline, Inc. will be responsible for providing solutions in the greater Philadelphia area, as well as Central Pennsylvania.

Barbieri & Kline has more than fifty (50) years of experience and dedication to the Specification/Bid & Spec Commercial Plumbing Market, which has positioned their Agency as one of the Top Manufacturers Representative Agencies in the Mid Atlantic Region.

The relationships they have cultivated with Architects, Engineers, Contractors and Wholesalers enables them to promote their product lines on their various projects. From Industrial to Residential, from Nursing Homes to Pharmaceutical, they target those applications that lend themselves to a specific need they can fill. For more information about Barbieri & Kline, its services or distribution channels, visit barbierikline.com.

To date, Aquanomix has signed more than 23 manufacturer’s representative firms across the United States and Canada. This expands the Aquanomix sales channel, providing more opportunities to reach potential end-users looking for water optimization and energy saving platforms for HVAC related piping systems solutions.

To learn more about Aquanomix and its products, please peruse our site.

 

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New US Water Stress Index Shows More Areas Vulnerable to Multiyear Drought

Read about it here:
drinking water week

Still Using City Water (Drinking Water!) in Your Cooling Tower?

Cooling systems are typically the greatest user of water in commercial and industrial buildings?

What if we monitored it so we could optimize it – potentially saving hundreds and thousands of gallons of water?

What if we reused that water – so ZERO city water (DRINKING WATER!) was being used at all?

Water Savings. Energy Savings. Cost Savings.

IT’S ALL POSSIBLE.

When the well is dry, we learn the worth

MAY THE FOURTH BE WITH YOU

“Younglings younglings, gather round,” said Yoda.

Just because water is priced too cheap in most of the world, doesn’t mean we can afford to waste it.

  • Freshwater withdrawals have tripled over the last 50 years.
  • The world’s population is growing by roughly 80 million people each year.
  • Changes in lifestyles and eating habits are requiring more water consumption per capita. Food demands will increase 50% by 2030.
  • Energy demand is also accelerating, with corresponding implications for water demand. Energy demands will increase by 60% by 2030.
  • Pollution knows no borders! 90% of wastewater in developing countries is untreated.

Wastewater treatment and water reuse are critical!

This May Fourth, remember to be mindful of our most precious resource and how quickly it’s running out.

“Always pass on what you have learned,” so says the Grand Master of the Jedi Order.

 

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