Save the drinking water for drinking and not for flushing.

That’s the goal of new legislation that would require many large new buildings in San Francisco to use gray water — waste water from baths, sinks and other kitchen appliances — for toilet flushing and in their irrigation systems.

Check out how Symphony can support not only California’s Title 24, Part 6 Regulation, but also support the city of San Francisco’s new legislation on gray-water use, in a new one-sheet available for viewing here.

The legislation applies to yet-to-be constructed buildings that are 250,000 square feet and larger and in the city’s “purple-pipe” district.

Did you know: at perhaps the greenest building in the state, the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission building is using treated sewage water from about 1,000 employees to flush their toilets and irrigate some of their plants.

Their HQ at 525 Golden Gate consumes 60% less water than similarly sized buildings.

  • One of the first buildings in the nation with onsite treatment of gray and black water
  • An onsite “Living Machine” reclaims and treats all of the building’s wastewater to satisfy 100% of the water demand for the building’s low-flow toilets and urinals
  • The “Living Machine” system treats 5,000 gallons of wastewater per day and reduces per person water consumption from 12 gallons (normal office building) to 5 gallons
  • The building’s 25,000 gallon rainwater harvesting system provides water for irrigation uses around the building.

 

SF Title 24